Piers Morgan boasts that he has £10 million in the bank before slamming BBC salaries as 'repulsive'

PIERS Morgan boasted he's got £10 million in the bank before slamming the rise in BBC salaries on Good Morning Britain today.

The 54-year-old host revealed his cash haul just a day before moaning about BBC director Lord Tony Hall's announcement that stars' salaries had risen by £10 million.

On Tuesday, Piers shared a bet from Paddy Power, which put him at odds of 2/1 to mention American football player Megan Rapinoe during the World Cup Semi Final between USA and England.

He wrote alongside the retweet: "I’ll have £10 million on that. Thanks."

And he was caught out when one follower tweeted him back: "You don't have £10million"

To which he replied: "I have."


 

On telly today, he fumed to GMB viewers that Lord Hall had refused to speak on the show about free TV licensees for the over 75s being cut as salaries had risen.

He said: "I genuinely think it could be the beginning of the end of the BBC … if they tell 3.5 million pensioners we’re effectively going to risk imprisoning you if you don’t pay your licence whilst dishing out millions to their celebrity talent roster and their own executives.

He added: "He’s [Lord Hall] ducking the show this morning because he basically knows he’s indefensible. I get why many viewers would see these salaries as repulsive."

Piers has an estimated net worth of £13million.

He has amassed this fortune largely down to the ITV shows he has appeared on.

And his comments come after the Beeb was accused of covering up sky-high payments to its top stars.

Critics said the broadcaster's list ignores “secret” payments to stars made through commercial arm BBC Studios.


What's more, the list said Graham Norton was paid £610,000 for his Radio 2 show.

In fact he is on more than £2million in total, with the cash for his chat show paid through a ­private production firm.

Strictly Come Dancing’s Claudia Winkleman was the second highest earning woman at £370,000 — but she again makes another £120,000 through BBC Studios.



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Also missing from the list are the Strictly judges. Each gets more than £150,000, with head judge Shirley Ballas on £250,000.

The One Show hosts Matt Baker and Alex Jones, who earn around £500,000 each, were also kept off the list.

The BBC’s top earner remains Match of the Day host Gary Lineker, who refused a pay cut. He got £1.75million.

THE SUN SAYS: BBC BOTTLERS

THE BBC should hang its head in shame.

And shame is plainly what bosses feel at the staggering pay rises they have lavished on millionaire stars while stripping OAPs of their free TV licence.

That’s why the most shocking salaries are squirrelled out of sight via a commercial arm whose payroll remains secret.

The BBC even took the coward’s route to closing its gender pay gap: handing colossal hikes to already fabulously paid women instead of slashing the wages of all their overpaid men.

So Radio 2 DJ Jo Whiley bafflingly gets a £100,000 rise (about 666 old folk will fund that alone). But grasping Gary ­Lineker keeps his £1,750,000 salary for reading the Match of the Day autocue.

Don’t worry, though, Gary . . . 11,000 over-75s can always cut down on their food and heat to keep Twitter’s favourite social justice warrior in clover.

The BBC is now indefensible. If it cannot survive on a £4billion-a-year bung without fleecing OAPs  it is far too big.

It needs total reform. Whole sections should shut, including its website.

If the BBC wants to pay its favoured luvvies commercial salaries, let them be a fully commercial operation funded by voluntary subscription like Netflix. Non-payment of the licence must be decriminalised, prior to abolishing the fee.

It has had its time . . . last century.

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