Sex parties allowed while weddings denied dance floors in Aussie city

With the coronavirus pandemic still forcing nations to implement policies to prevent the spread, one city has allowed sex parties to go ahead.

Weddings are being controlled and citizens face heavier penalties for breaking rules than they would by attending sex parties.

Sex and strip clubs have been affected differently in Queensland, Australia reports News.au.com.

If clubs implement Covid-19 safe plans, they are free to operate.

This includes regular cleaning of rooms and training staff to mitigate risk.

However, wedding operators have been told to comply with a number of restrictions including keeping the guest list under 100 in coronavirus safe venues.

Although the bride and groom are permitted to perform their "first dance" – dance floors are banned.

“Their wedding guests may not participate in the dancing,” Queensland Health advises.

If a wedding takes place in a private home, the number of people is limited to 30.

Queensland Health said in a statement: “Planning for specific scenarios and circumstances during this pandemic has been a unique challenge for health departments across the globe.

“Queensland’s COVID Safe Plans are our best system to balance the health response necessary to keep our community safe with keeping life as normal as possible.

“Those operating under COVID Safe Industry Plans or COVID Safe Checklists are aware of their roles and responsibilities in conducting business during a pandemic to prevent any uncontrolled spread of COVID-19.”

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Annalisa Mastrofilippo, 24, a bride-to-be has launched a petition to ease wedding restrictions.

Founder of Wedded Wonderland Wendy El-Khoury has also spoken out.

Speaking to news.au.com she said: “From sporting activities, to gyms, schools, parks and shopping centres working with no capacity on numbers (rather a four sqm rule) it makes no sense for a wedding venue with a 1000 seated capacity to work with numbers like 150 in NSW for example."

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